Short Communication Open Access
Profile of Inflammatory Bowel Disease from a Tertiary Care Center in North East India
Anjan Jyoti Talukdar*
Department of Medicine, Gauhati Medical College and Hospital, Bhangagarh, Guwahati, Assam, 781 032, India
*Corresponding author: Anjan Jyoti Talukdar, Department of Medicine, Gauhati Medical College and Hospital, Bhangagarh, Guwahati, Assam, 781 032, India, Email: @
Received: August 17, 2017; Accepted: September 25, 2017; Published: March 29, 2018
Citation: Anjan Jyoti Talukdar (2018) Profile of Inflammatory Bowel Disease from a Tertiary Care Center in North East India. Gastroenterol Pancreatol Liver Disord 6(2): 1-2. DOI: 10.15226/2374-815X/6/2/001124
Inflammatory Bowel Disease was believed to be unknown in India about 20 years ago. But several reports have been published which shows that its prevalence in India is not that uncommon as perceived.

Reports from North East India on IBD are rare. Keeping this in mind an effort was made to collect data on IBD in a tertiary care hospital in North East India.
Ulcerative Colitis
The hospital prevalence of UC patients was found to be 22.9/100,000 patients. The mean duration from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis was less than a year. Male to female ratio was 1.45:1.

Of our Ulcerative Colitis patients, 45% had extensive disease; left sided disease was seen in 37%, procto-sigmoid involvement was seen in 18% and no patients had isolated proctitis. Only arthralgia was present as an extra-intestinal manifestation in 11.11% patients. Surprisingly we did not encounter any other extra-intestinal manifestation.

On presentation moderate disease was seen in 59%, 15% had mild disease and severe disease was seen in 26%.

Majority (65%) of our patients required steroids for remission and only 35% patients responded to 5-ASA alone.
Crohns Disease
The hospital prevalence of Crohn’s Disease in our study was 9.4 per 100,000 patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was about 2 years.

The common symptoms were abdominal pain (90%), loose stools (63%) and weight loss (63%),. Extra-intestinal manifestations were seen in 27% patients in the form of arthralgia.

73% patients had small intestinal disease and 27% had ileo-colonic disease. No patients had only colonic involvement.

64% of the patients required steroids for remission.

Striking difference was the pattern of gut involvement in Crohn’s disease where majority of our patients had small intestinal involvement.
Table 1: Ulcerative Colitis: Extent and Severity in comparison to different centers in India

Region

Procto- Sigmoid (%)

Left Sided (%)

Pancolitis (%)

Mild disease (%)

Moderate disease (%)

Severe disease (%)

Our study

18

37

45

15

59

26

Sood   et   al Ludhiana

25

47

28

15

30

55

Kochar  et  al Chandigarh

18

41

41

14

25

61

Nigam  et  al Gorakpur

34

46

20

47

39

14

Table 2: Crohn’s Disease: Presenting Features in comparison to different centers in India

Region

Diarrhoea (%)

Abdominal pain (%)

Weight loss (%)

Fever (%)

Mass (%)

Rectal bleed (%)

Arthralgia (%)

Our study

63

90

63

27

0

27

12

Philip  et al

70

71

---

37

---

41

12

Polimoo e t a l Vellore

64

46

37

---

13

---

22

Tandon et al

76.4

94.1

88.2

---

---

---

---

Table 3: Crohn’s Disease: Pattern of gut involvement in comparison to different centers in India

Region

Colon alone (%)

Small bowel alone (%)

Both involved (%)

Ileo-colonic (%)

Rectal Alone (%)

Our study

0

72

0

28

0

Polimoo  et  al Vellore

50

----

---

60-70

---

Amrapurkar  & Patel

25

10

65

60

20

Philip   et   al Kochi

35

20

45

---

18

Tandon  et  al Delhi

53

---

47

---

---

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